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Acromegaly FAQs (cont.)

Other questions about acromegaly

Can acromegaly be cured?

Acromegaly can be put into remission. This means that the disease is stopped and many of the signs and symptoms reversed. But, acromegaly can be a lifelong disease. Drug and/or radiation therapy typically goes on for several years. Even after successful therapy, you will need to see your health care provider regularly to have your growth hormone and IGF-1 levels checked.

How can acromegaly be prevented?

There is no known way to prevent acromegaly. Early detection is the best hope of preventing severe symptoms and complications.

What does it mean to live with acromegaly?

Treatments for acromegaly do work in a significant proportion of people. Unfortunately, however, the disease is rarely caught early enough to prevent permanent damage or even premature death.

Bone changes of acromegaly are permanent. Many of the soft-tissue changes, such as swelling, enlarged tongue, thickened skin, acne, carpal tunnel syndrome, and goiter, and sexual problems, are reversible with treatment.

Complications such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and high triglycerides start to reverse when the levels of growth hormone and IGF-1 are normalized. Correction of these complications can prevent more serious illness, such as stroke, heart disease, and death.

Where Can I Go For More Information?

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Pituitary Network Association

The Hormone Foundation

The Endocrine Society

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

Medically reviewed by John A. Seibel, MD; Board Certified Internal Medicine with a subspecialty in Endocrinology & Metabolism


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/28/2014
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Acromegaly FAQs - Diagnosis

How was your, or your child's, acromegaly diagnosed?




Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Acromegaly »

Increased and unregulated growth hormone (GH) production, usually caused by a GH-secreting pituitary tumor (somatotroph tumor), characterizes acromegaly.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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