font size
A
A
A

Adenosine

How does Adenosine work?

Adenosine blocks faulty circuitry in the heart, which causes irregular heart rhythm. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) might prevent changes in energy metabolism that cause weight loss in people with advanced cancer.

Are there safety concerns?

Adenosine appears to be safe for most people when given by injection by qualified healthcare givers. It can cause breathing problems and chest pain, particularly when given at high doses. Headache, heart pounding, low blood pressure, nausea, sweating, flushing, lightheadedness, sleep problems, coughing, and anxiety can also occur.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of adenosine during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Gout: ATP can raise the level of uric acid in the blood stream and in the urine, and this might trigger a case of gout. Gout causes red, hot, tender, swollen joints. The joint that is most often affected is at the base of the big toe.

Heart disease: ATP can cause reduced blood flow to the heart and chest pain. It might worsen symptoms in patients with heart diseases such as chest pain and heart attack.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Pill Finder Tool

Need help identifying pills and medications?
Use the pill identifier tool on RxList.

Therapeutic Research Faculty copyright

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.



Medical Dictionary