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Agaricus Mushroom

How does Agaricus Mushroom work?

Agaricus mushroom contains chemicals that might improve the body's use of insulin and decrease insulin resistance in people with type 2 diabetes. Some developing research also suggests it might be able to strengthen the immune system, fight tumor development, and work as an antioxidant.

Are there safety concerns?

Agaricus mushroom extract seems to be safe for most people when taken for up to 12 weeks. Powdered agaricus seems to be safe for most people when taken for up to 6 months. Agaricus products can cause blood sugar to go too low (hypoglycemia) in some people with diabetes. They can also cause itching, nausea, and diarrhea.

A few people who took agaricus mushroom during treatment for cancer have developed severe liver damage, and a few have had allergic reactions.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of agaricus mushroom during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Liver disease: There is some concern that agaricus mushroom might cause liver disease or make it worse. Don't use it if you have liver disease.

Surgery: Agaricus mushroom might lower blood sugar. There is some concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during surgery. Stop using agaricus mushroom at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.



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