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Alzheimer's Disease Support (cont.)

Learning About Alzheimer's Disease

One of the best ways to help someone with Alzheimer's disease is to learn about the disease. This way, you can recognize the changes in behavior, personality, and daily life, and can understand a little what your loved one is experiencing.

Check out the articles and web sites above for excellent information about Alzheimer's disease and tips for caregivers.

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Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Alzheimer's Disease Support:

Alzheimer's Disease - Caring for Yourself

What tips can you share with others about caring for yourself with Alzheimer's disease?

Alzheimer's Disease - Caring for the Caregiver

What steps do you take to take care of yourself, as a caregiver?

Alzheimer's Disease - Communicating

Please share your experiences with communicating with a person with Alzheimer's disease.

Alzheimer's Disease - Caregiving Experience

Please share your experience with caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease.





Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Alzheimer Disease »

Alzheimer disease (Alzheimer’s disease, AD), the most common cause of dementia1, isan acquired cognitive and behavioral impairment of sufficient severity that markedly interferes with social and occupational functioning.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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