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Ambrette

How does Ambrette work?

There isn't enough information to know how ambrette works.

Are there safety concerns?

Ambrette is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts found in food. The safety of taking larger amounts by mouth is unknown.

Ambrette is also POSSIBLY SAFE when a small amount of the dilute oil is applied directly to the skin. In some people, ambrette can cause skin irritation.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking ambrette if you are pregnant. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for nursing mothers to take ambrette by mouth or apply it to the skin. Ambrette seems to stay in mother's milk, but the importance of this is unknown.

Diabetes: Myricetin, a chemical in ambrette, can affect blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully, if you have diabetes and use ambrette in amounts larger than the amounts normally found in food.

Surgery: Myricetin, a chemical in ambrette, might affect blood sugar and might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking ambrette at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.



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