Font Size
A
A
A
...
13
...

Anatomy of the Eye (cont.)

Retina/Macula/Choroid

The retina acts like the film in a camera to create an image. When focused light strikes the retina, chemical reactions occur within specialized layers of cells. These chemical reactions cause electrical signals, which are transmitted through nerve cells into the optic nerve, which carries these signals to the brain, where the electrical signals are converted into recognizable images. Visual association areas of the brain further process the signals to make them understandable within the correct context.

The retina has two types of cells that initiate these chemical reactions. These cells are termed photoreceptors and the two distinct types of cells are the rods and cones. Rods are more sensitive to light; therefore, they allow one to see in low light situations but do not allow one to see color. Cones, on the other hand, allow people to see color, but require more light.

The macula is located in the central part of the retina and has the highest concentration of cones. It is the area of the retina that is responsible for providing sharp central vision.

The choroid is a layer of tissue that lies between the retina and the sclera. It is mostly made up of blood vessels. The choroid helps to nourish the retina.

Must Read Articles Related to Anatomy of the Eye

Cataracts
Cataracts A cataract clouds the lens of the eye, limiting vision. Historically, cataracts were common among such ancient peoples as the Sumeri, the Egyptians, and the Ind...learn more >>
Corneal Abrasion
Corneal Abrasion A corneal abrasion is a painful scrape or scratch of the surface of the clear part of the eye. This clear tissue of the eye is known as the cornea.learn more >>
Eye Allergies
Eye Allergies Up to 50 million Americans suffer from the miseries of allergies, with allergic reactions involving the eyes being a common complaint. An allergic reaction that...learn more >>



Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Orbit Anatomy »

Surgical practice begins with a detailed knowledge of anatomy.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary