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Andiroba

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What other names is Andiroba known by?

Andiroba-Saruba, Bastard Mahogany, Brazilian Mahogany, Caoba Bastarda, Caoba del Brasil, Caobilla, Carapa, Carapa guianensis, Carapa Rouge, Cedro, Cedro Macho, Crabwood, Iandirova, Mahogany, Najesí, Requia.

What is Andiroba?

Andiroba is a plant. The bark and leaf, as well as oil from the fruit and the seed, are used to make medicine.

People take a tea made from andiroba bark and leaf to treat fevers, herpes, and worm infections; and as a tonic. Andiroba fruit oil is taken for coughs.

Some people apply andiroba bark and leaf directly to the skin for sores, ulcers, and skin troubles. It is used on the skin for removing ticks and skin parasites.

The seed oil is used directly on the skin to treat swelling (inflammation), arthritis, rashes, muscle and joint aches and injuries, wounds, boils, and herpes ulcers.

In manufacturing, andiroba is used as a solvent for dissolving and removing dyes from plants, as a lamp oil, and as an insect repellent.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...



TAKEN BY MOUTH
  • Fevers.
  • Herpes.
  • Intestinal worms.
  • Coughs.
  • Other conditions.
APPLIED TO THE SKIN
  • Insect repellent. Early research suggests that applying 100% andiroba oil to the skin protects against mosquito bites, but not as well as applying 50% DEET.
  • Skin conditions.
  • Sores.
  • Ulcers.
  • Removing ticks.
  • Skin parasites.
  • Arthritis.
  • Muscle and joint aches and injuries.
  • Wounds.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of andiroba for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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