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Anise

How does Anise work?

There are chemicals in anise that may have estrogen-like effects. Chemicals in anise may also act as insecticides.

Are there safety concerns?

Anise is LIKELY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth in amounts typically found in foods. There isn't enough information available to know if anise is safe to take by mouth in medicinal amounts.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Anise is LIKELY SAFE for pregnant and breast-feeding women when used as part of a normal diet. It's not known whether it's safe to use anise in larger medicinal amounts during pregnancy or when breast-feeding. Stick to food amounts.

Children: Anise is LIKELY SAFE for most children when taken by mouth in amounts typically found in foods. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when applied to the scalp in combination with other herbs, short-term. There isn't enough information available to know if anise is safe to take by mouth in medicinal amounts.

Allergies: Anise might cause allergic reactions in some people who are allergic to other plants that are similar to anise. Plants that are similar to anise include asparagus, caraway, celery, coriander, cumin, dill, and fennel.

Hormone-sensitive condition such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Anise might act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don't use anise.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.



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