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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (cont.)

Follow-up

The primary-care provider, behavioral pediatrician, or child and adolescent psychiatrist will want to see the caregiver and the child often at first to monitor progress and response to therapy. Once the individual's condition is stabilized, follow-up visits will be regular but less frequent.

  • The frequency of follow-up visits is quite variable and is dictated by the person's characteristics and convenience, provider experience, and use of psychotherapy.
  • Follow-up visits every four to 12 weeks are often appropriate for the first year. After that, visits every three to four months for medication assessment may be adequate for a person whose condition is stable.
  • Behavioral therapy may need to be ongoing for months or years.

Federal and state laws grant special educational accommodations for children with ADHD and learning disabilities. Local school districts and regional/state departments of education can provide specific resources available in the local community.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/2/2014

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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder »

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental condition of inattention and distractibility, with or without accompanying hyperactivity.

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