Font Size
A
A
A

Automated External Defibrillators (AED) (cont.)

Automated External Defibrillators (AED) Pictures

This is a heart tracing (ECG) of a person experiencing ventricular fibrillation. Ventricular fibrillation is the most common ECG finding when an adult suffers cardiac arrest. Click to view larger image.

Ventricular fibrillation can be successfully treated with defibrillation. Click to view larger image.

Minutes count. For every minute that a person in ventricular fibrillation is not defibrillated, the chances of resuscitation drop by almost 10% per minute. Click to view larger image.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can temporarily provide some oxygen to the brain. Click to view larger image.

The Chain of Survival involves Early Access to 911, Early CPR, Early Defibrillation, and Early Advanced Life Support. Click to view larger image.

Call 911 immediately when an adult is found to be unresponsive. Click to view larger image.

CPR buys some time until a defibrillator becomes available. Click to view larger image.

Early defibrillation is the most important link in the Chain of Survival. Click to view larger image.

Early advanced life support is the last link in the Chain of Survival. Click to view larger image.

Manual defibrillators are used by trained health care professionals. Click to view larger image.

In the 1970s, portable defibrillators began to be used outside the hospital by many Emergency Medical Services systems. Click to view larger image.

Automated external defibrillators allowed defibrillation to be performed with a minimal amount of training. Click to view larger image.

The use of AEDs by police units allowed defibrillation to be performed even before the ambulance arrived. Click to view larger image.

Ventricular fibrillation victim Julie Lycksell, an operating room nurse, was resuscitated with an AED by Suffolk County, New York Police Officer James Briarton. Click to view larger image.

One AED manufacturer provides a pediatric electrode cable that allows the AED to be used on children younger than 8 years. Click to view larger image.

Medically reviewed by Avrom Simon, MD; Board Certified Preventative Medicine with Subspecialty in Occupational Medicine

REFERENCES:

American Heart Association. 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Supplement to Circulation; Nov 2010; Vol 122; Issue 18; Supplement 3.

Stapleton ER. AEDs in the School. The Louis J. Acompora Memorial Foundation; 2001.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/23/2015
Atrial Fibrillation Slideshow



Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Automatic External Defibrillation »

Kouwenhouven showed that electrical shocks applied to dogs within 30 seconds of an induced ventricular fibrillation (VF) could produce a 98% rate of resuscitation; however, those shocked after 2 minutes of VF had only a 27% resuscitation rate.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary