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Birth Control (cont.)

IN THIS ARTICLE

Emergency Contraception

You can use emergency contraception if a condom breaks, you've forgotten a pill, you are taking other medicines that may affect contraception medicines, or you have had unprotected sex. Emergency contraception does not protect against sexually transmitted diseases.

For more information, see the topic Emergency Contraception.

When to Call a Doctor

For many methods of birth control, you'll need to see your doctor to get a prescription. If you want to start birth control, talk with your doctor about options that are right for you. And if you have problems with a birth control method, talk with your doctor. He or she may recommend another birth control method or help you solve the problem you are having.

Other Places To Get Help

Organizations

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)
409 12th Street SW
P.O. Box 96920
Washington, DC 20090-6920
Phone: (202) 638-5577
Email: resources@acog.org
Web Address: www.acog.org

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) is a nonprofit organization of professionals who provide health care for women, including teens. The ACOG Resource Center publishes manuals and patient education materials. The Web publications section of the site has patient education pamphlets on many women's health topics, including reproductive health, breast-feeding, violence, and quitting smoking.


Emergency Contraception Website
Phone: 1-888-NOT-2-LATE (1-888-668-2528)
Web Address: ec.princeton.edu

This Web site provides information about emergency contraception. This includes the correct use, effectiveness, and expected side effects of emergency contraception, along with how regular contraceptive pills can be used for emergency contraception. The Web site is operated by the Office of Population Research at Princeton University and by the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals.

A searchable database of emergency contraceptive providers in the United States is also available.


National Women's Health Information Center
8270 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive
Fairfax, VA 22031
Phone: 1-800-994-9662
(202) 690-7650
Fax: (202) 205-2631
TDD: 1-888-220-5446
Web Address: www.womenshealth.gov

The National Women's Health Information Center (NWHIC) is a service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health. NWHIC provides women's health information to a variety of audiences, including consumers, health professionals, and researchers.


Planned Parenthood Federation of America
434 West 33rd Street
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 1-800-230-PLAN (1-800-230-7526)
(212) 541-7800
Fax: (212) 245-1845
Web Address: www.plannedparenthood.org

The Planned Parenthood Federation of American provides comprehensive reproductive health care and consumer information about family planning, sexual health, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

The Teen Talk Web site (www.plannedparenthood.org/teen-talk) has information for teens about dating, teen pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, how teens can protect themselves against STDs, and more.


World Health Organization Contraception Page
Avenue Appia 20
1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland
Phone: +41 22 791 2111
Fax: +41 22 791 3111
Web Address: www.who.int/topics/contraception/en

This Web site of the World Health Organization (WHO) features links to related sites, fact sheets, and publications with information on contraception and family planning.


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