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Bladderwrack

How does Bladderwrack work?

Bladderwrack, like many sea plants, contains varying amounts of iodine, which is used to prevent or treat some thyroid disorders. Bladderwrack products may contain varying amounts of iodine, which makes it an inconsistent source of iodine. Bladderwrack also contains algin, which can act as a laxative to help stool pass through the bowels.

Are there safety concerns?

Bladderwrack appears to be UNSAFE. It may contain high concentrations of iodine, which could cause or worsen some thyroid problems. Prolonged, high intake of dietary iodine is associated with goiter and increased risk of thyroid cancer. Treatment of thyroid problems should not be attempted without medical supervision.

Like other sea plants, bladderwrack can concentrate toxic heavy metals, such as arsenic, from the water in which it lives.

Do not take bladderwrack if:
  • You are pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • You have a thyroid problem known as hyperthyroidism (too much thyroid hormone), or hypothyroidism (too little thyroid hormone).
  • You are allergic to iodine.
  • You are trying to become pregnant.
  • You are scheduled for surgery in the next two weeks. Bladderwrack might increase the risk of bleeding.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.



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