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Bone Spurs (cont.)

Causes of Bone Spurs

Bone spurs typically occur because of continued stress or rubbing of a bone for a prolonged period of time. This can be due to osteoarthritis or inflammation such as tendinitis. Normally there is a layer of cartilage along the edges of bones where they come together to form a joint. With osteoarthritis, this cartilage layer becomes worn away, and the bones can rub directly against each other. New bone forms in response to the stress or inflammation. It is the bone's method of trying to stabilize or protect itself.

There are other medical conditions that are commonly associated with bone spurs. These include a condition known as plantar fasciitis. This is an inflammation of the fascia or connective tissue on the bottom of the foot where it attaches to the heel bone or calcaneus. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and ankylosing spondylitis are both inflammatory disorders that affect the body's ligaments and causes bone spurs in the spine.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/27/2014

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