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Boron

How does Boron work?

Boron seems to affect the way the body handles other minerals such as magnesium and phosphorus. It also seems to increase estrogen levels in post-menopausal women and healthy men. Estrogen is thought to be helpful in maintaining healthy bones and mental function. Boric acid, a common form of boron, can kill fungi (yeast) that cause vaginal infections.

Are there safety concerns?

Boron is safe for most people when used in doses less than 20 mg per day. Doses less than 10 mg per day are unlikely to cause adverse effects in adults.

Large quantities can cause poisoning. Signs of poisoning include skin inflammation and peeling, irritability, tremors, convulsions, weakness, headaches, depression, diarrhea, vomiting, and other symptoms.

Boric acid, a common form of boron, appears to be safe when used vaginally. It can cause a sensation of vaginal burning.

Boron is safe for pregnant and lactating women age 19-50 when used in doses less that 20 mg per day. Pregnant and lactating women age 14 to 18 should not take more then 17 mg per day. Higher amounts can be harmful. However, boric acid should not be used by pregnant women because it has been linked to birth defects.

Do not take boron if:

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.



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