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Brain Cancer (cont.)

Support Groups and Counseling

Living with cancer presents many new challenges for the patient and their family and friends.

  • Patients have many worries about how the cancer will affect them and their ability to "live a normal life," that is, to care for family and home, to hold a job, and to continue friendships and activities.
  • Many people feel anxious and depressed. Some people feel angry and resentful; others feel helpless and defeated.

For most people with cancer, talking about their feelings and concerns helps.

  • Friends and family members can be very supportive. They may be hesitant to offer support until they see how the person is coping with the disease. If patients want to talk about their concerns, the patient should be encouraged to do so with their friends and family.
  • Some people don't want to "burden" their loved ones or they prefer talking about their concerns with a more neutral professional. A social worker, counselor, or member of the clergy can be helpful if a patient wants to discuss their feelings and concerns about having cancer. The patient's oncologist should be able to recommend someone.
  • Many people with cancer are helped profoundly by talking to other people who have cancer. Sharing concerns with others who have been through the same thing can be remarkably reassuring. Support groups of people with cancer may be available through the medical center where you are receiving your treatment. The American Cancer Society also has information about support groups all over the United States.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/23/2014

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