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Brain Cancer (cont.)

When to Seek Medical Care for Brain Cancer

Seek care from a health-care provider right away, probably emergently, if a person develops any of the following symptoms:

  • Unexplained, persistent vomiting
  • Double vision or unexplained blurring of vision, especially on only one side
  • Lethargy or increased sleepiness
  • New seizures
  • New pattern or type of headaches, especially early morning headaches

Although headaches are thought to be a common symptom of brain cancer, they may not occur until late in the progression of the disease. If any significant change in a person's headache pattern occurs rapidly, health-care providers may suggest that you go the emergency department. If a person has a known brain tumor, any new symptoms or relatively sudden or rapid worsening of symptoms also warrants a trip to the nearest hospital emergency department. Be on the lookout for the following new symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Changes in mental status, such as excessive sleepiness, memory problems, or inability to concentrate
  • Visual changes or other sensory problems
  • Difficulty with speech or in expressing yourself
  • Changes in behavior or personality
  • Clumsiness or difficulty walking
  • Nausea or vomiting (especially in middle-aged or older people)
  • Sudden onset of fever, especially if the patient is receiving chemotherapy treatments.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/23/2014

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