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Broken Nose (cont.)

Broken Nose Follow-up

Patient Comments

About 3-5 days after the swelling in the nose has gone away, a person may be referred to an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) doctor, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMFS), or a plastic surgeon.

Follow-up care should not be delayed. A delay, especially longer than 7-10 days, may cause a broken bone to be set in a deformed state.

Broken Nose Prevention

  • Avoid drug and alcohol use. Many nose breaks occur during or after abuse of these drugs.
  • Follow safety rules when participating in sports and physical recreation.
  • Wear a seatbelt at all times while riding in a motor vehicle.
  • Make sure children are in an approved car seat when riding in a vehicle.

Broken Nose Prognosis

If a nasal injury is minor, further care may not be needed. Many will need a follow-up visit in about 3-7 days after the swelling has resolved. If a severe break has occurred, corrective surgery may be required.

Medically reviewed by John A. Daller, MD; American Board of Surgery with subspecialty certification in surgical critical care

REFERENCES:

Hwang K, You SH, Lee HS. Outcome analysis of sports-related multiple facial fractures. J Craniofac Surg. May 2009;20(3):825-9.

MedscapeReference.com. Nasal and Septal Fractures.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/7/2016

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The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Broken Nose:

Broken Nose - Symptoms

What symptoms did you experience with a broken nose?

Broken Nose - Treatment

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Broken Nose - Follow-up

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Nasal and Septal Fractures »

Nasal fractures are the most common types of facial fractures; however, they are often unrecognized and untreated at the time of injury.

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