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Cervicitis (cont.)

Cervicitis Causes

  • A vaginal infection or a sexually transmitted disease (such as gonorrhea, Chlamydia, and trichomoniasis) can cause cervicitis.
  • HIV, infection with the herpes virus (genital herpes), and human papillomavirus (HPV, genital warts) are additional STDs (also now called STIs) that put you at risk for developing cervicitis.
  • You are at increased risk if you have sexual relations at an early age or engage in high-risk sexual behavior with many partners or have a history of sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Injury or irritation (a reaction to the chemicals in douches and contraceptives or a forgotten tampon) also can cause the disease. The objects may simply cause irritation and make the cervix more susceptible to infection.
  • You may have an allergy to contraceptive spermicides or to latex in condoms that leads to cervicitis.
  • Infections are much more often responsible for cervicitis than non-infectious causes.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/9/2012

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Cervicitis »

Cervicitis is an inflammation of the uterine cervix.

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