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Chaparral

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What other names is Chaparral known by?

Creosote Bush, Créosotier, Greasewood, Hediondilla, Jarilla, Larrea divaricata, Larrea tridentata, Larreastat, Larrea mexicana, Zygophyllum tridentatum.

What is Chaparral?

Chaparral is a plant. The leaf is used to make medicine, but there are serious safety concerns. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada have advised consumers against using products containing chaparral due to safety concerns. Despite warnings, chaparral is still available in the U.S. Chaparral is not permitted by Health Canada because it is not an authorized natural health product. Chaparral is sometimes an ingredient in diluted homeopathic preparations. The safety concerns do no generally apply to homeopathic preparations containing chaparral due to the extreme dilutions.

Chaparral is used for digestion problems including cramps and gas; respiratory tract conditions including colds and infections; and ongoing chronic skin disorders. It is also used for cancer, arthritis, tuberculosis, urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases, central nervous system conditions, chickenpox, parasite infections, obesity, and snakebite pain. Some people use chaparral for detoxification, or as a tonic or "blood purifier."

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of chaparral for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Therapeutic Research Faculty copyright

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.



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