Font Size
A
A
A
...
5
...

Chemical Eye Burns (cont.)

When to Seek Medical Care

The next best step if possible is to find out what type of chemical you have been exposed to. You can look on the product label or call your regional Poison Control Center at (800) 222-1222 to find out more information about a specific chemical.

If the chemical is an irritant (with a neutral pH) and symptoms are only minor or nonexistent, then you may monitor your condition at home with a call to your ophthalmologist (a medical doctor who specializes in eye care and surgery). Make sure the burn does not worsen. If it does, call your ophthalmologist to arrange an appointment for that day or go to the Emergency Room if an Ophthalmologist is not available.

If you have any question about the danger of a chemical, if you do not know what it is, or if you have significant symptoms, go immediately to the nearest hospital's emergency department.

Any time you experience pain, tearing, redness, irritation, or vision loss, go to a hospital's emergency department for immediate evaluation, even if you believe the chemical is only a mild irritant.

All acid or alkali eye burns require immediate treatment and evaluation by a doctor. You should be taken immediately to the closest emergency department. If you suspect a serious injury may have occurred or are otherwise not able to make the trip to the emergency room quickly, then you should call an ambulance to shorten transport time. All industries are required to keep a Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) on any chemicals being used. Find this information and take it with you.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/28/2014

Must Read Articles Related to Chemical Eye Burns

Eye Pain
Eye Pain Eye pain has many causes, signs, symptoms, and treatments. It's also described as pain behind the eye, eye socket pain, or shooting pain in the eye. Headaches a...learn more >>




Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Burns, Ocular »

Burns to the sclera, conjunctiva, cornea, and eyelid are considered ocular burns.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary