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Chromium

IN THIS ARTICLE

Are there any interactions with medications?



Insulin
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Insulin is used to decrease blood sugar. Chromium might increase how well insulin works. Taking chromium along with insulin might cause your blood sugar to drop too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your insulin might need to be changed.



Levothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid, Levoxyl, and others)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Taking chromium with levothyroxine (Synthroid) might decrease how much levothyroxine (Synthroid) that the body absorbs. This might make levothyroxine (Synthroid) less effective. To help avoid this interaction, levothyroxine (Synthroid) should be taken 30 minutes before or 3-4 hours after taking chromium.



Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Chromium might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking chromium along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, metformin (Glucophage), pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), and others.



Aspirin
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Aspirin might increase how much chromium the body absorbs and increase chromium levels in the blood. In theory, taking aspirin with chromium might increase the risk of adverse effects.



NSAIDs (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

NSAIDs are anti-inflammatory medications used for decreasing pain and swelling. NSAIDs might increase chromium levels in the body and increase the risk of adverse effects. Avoid taking chromium supplements and NSAIDs at the same time.

Some NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), aspirin, and others.

Dosing considerations for Chromium.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

ADULTS

BY MOUTH:
  • General: The safe and tolerable upper intake levels of chromium are not known. However, daily adequate intake (AI) levels for chromium have been established: men 14 to 50 years, 35 mcg; men 51 and older, 30 mcg; women 19 to 50 years, 25 mcg; women 51 and older, 20 mcg; pregnant women 14 to 18 years, 29 mcg; 19 to 50 years, 30 mcg; breast-feeding women 14 to 18 years, 44 mcg; 19 to 50 years, 45 mcg.
  • For diabetes: In people with type 2 diabetes, 200-1000 mcg of chromium taken daily in a single or divided doses has been used. Also, a specific combination product providing chromium 600 mcg plus biotin 2 mg daily (Diachrome, Nutrition 21) has also been used for up to 3 months. In addition, 1000 mcg of chromium (as chromium yeast) together with 1000 mg of vitamins C and 800 IU of vitamin E daily for 6 months has been used. In people with gestational diabetes, 4-8 mcg/kg of chromium picolinate daily for 8 weeks has been used. In people with high blood sugar due use of corticosteroid medication, 400 mcg of chromium once daily or 200 mcg three times daily has been used.
  • For high cholesterol: 50-250 mcg of chromium as chromium chloride or chromium picolinate, or brewer's yeast containing 15-48 mcg of chromium, has been used 5-7 days weekly for up to 16 months. 200 mcg of chromium polynicotinate along with 100 mg of grape seed extract, taken twice daily for 2 months, has been used. One to two capsules of a specific supplement (Colenon) containing 240 mg of chitosan, 55 mg of Garcinia cambogia extract, and 19 mg of chromium taken daily for 4 weeks has been used.

CHILDREN

BY MOUTH:
  • General: The safe and tolerable upper intake levels of chromium in children are not known. However, daily adequate intake (AI) levels for chromium have been established: Infants 0 to 6 months, 0.2 mcg; 7 to 12 months, 5.5 mcg; children 1 to 3 years, 11 mcg; 4 to 8 years, 15 mcg; boys 9 to 13 years, 25 mcg; girls 9 to 13 years, 21 mcg; 14 to 18 years, 24 mcg.
  • For high cholesterol: 400-600 mcg of chromium polynicotinate and 1000-1500 mg of glucomannan has been used twice daily for 8 weeks.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.



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