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Colic

Colic Overview

Few topics generate anxiety in new parents as the possibility that their infant may have colic. First described in biblical times, Dr. Morris A. Wessel defined colic in 1954 as "excessive" crying lasting more than three hours a day, more than three days per week, and for more than three consecutive weeks. These children are otherwise well and their crying is not due to either pain or hunger. This inordinate crying starts about 2 weeks of age, hits a maximum in intensity at about 6-8 weeks of age, and then gradually diminishes with resolution by 16 weeks of age. Many developmental specialists point out that premature babies will follow this same pattern and also start their colicky experience about two weeks after their due date (regardless of actual date of birth). Studies have indicated that some healthy newborns may experience colic.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/24/2015
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Colic Signs and Symptoms

Most babies will cry less when they are held, fed, and given attention. These things may not work for babies who have colic. When they are crying, they may clench their fists and stiffen their stomach and legs. Some babies arch their back, while others pull up their legs to their stomach.

Vomiting, diarrhea, fever, or blood or mucus in the stool is not a symptom of colic. If your baby has any of these symptoms, he or she needs to be checked by a doctor.

SOURCE:

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Colic »

Colic is commonly described as a behavioral syndrome characterized by excessive, paroxysmal crying. Colic is most likely to occur in the evenings, and it occurs without any identifiable cause.

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