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Concussion (cont.)

Concussion Treatment

Bed rest, fluids, and a mild pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) may be prescribed.

  • Ice may be applied to bumps to relieve pain and decrease swelling.
  • Cuts are numbed with medication such as lidocaine, by injection or topical application. The cut is then cleansed thoroughly with a saline solution and possibly an iodine solution. The doctor will explore the injury to look for foreign matter and hidden injuries. The wound usually is closed with skin staples, stitches (sutures), or, occasionally, a skin glue called cyanoacrylate (Dermabond).

Concussion Follow-up

After initial treatment, the patient will be referred for follow-up care to their primary care doctor or a specialist, such as a neurologist. It is important to keep these appointments, particularly because some of the more subtle problems of concussion (memory deficits, personality changes, and changes in cognition) may not be apparent at the time of the initial injury.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/19/2016

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