Font Size
A
A
A
...
6
...

Corneal Flash Burns (cont.)

Exams and Tests

To make the diagnosis, your ophthalmologist or the physician in the hospital's emergency department will take a history, examine your eyes, and discuss recent exposure you may have had to ultraviolet light.

  • Your vision, eyelids, pupils, and back of the eye are checked.
  • Your ophthalmologist looks at the surface of your eyes using special equipment, such as a slit lamp, made especially for examining the eye's surface.
  • A numbing eyedrop to allow your eye to be examined and a painless dye called fluorescein may be put onto your eye to aid in the examination. The stain temporarily makes your eye look yellow but goes away after a few minutes. A special blue light is then used to evaluate the stained eye to determine if corneal damage is present. A damaged cornea, coupled with a history of ultraviolet light exposure, confirms the diagnosis of radiation eye burns or corneal flash burns.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/31/2015

Must Read Articles Related to Corneal Flash Burns

Chemical Eye Burns
Chemical Eye Burns Chemical burns to the eye or eyelid make up roughly 10% of all eye injuries. Depending on the type of chemical and how long the eye was exposed to it, chemical ...learn more >>
Corneal Abrasion
Corneal Abrasion A corneal abrasion is a painful scrape o...learn more >>
Eye Pain
Eye Pain Eye pain has many causes, signs, symptoms, and treatments. It's also described as learn more >>

Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Ultraviolet Keratitis »

UV light is the most common cause of radiation injury to the eye. The cornea absorbs most UV radiation.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary