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Deanol

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What other names is Deanol known by?

2-Dimethyl Aminoethanol, 2-Dimethylaminoethanol, Acéglumate de Déanol, Acétamido-benzoate de Déanol, Benzilate de Déanol, Bisorcate de Déanol, Cyclohexylpropionate de Déanol, Déanol, Deanol Aceglumate, Deanol Acetamidobenzoate, Deanol Benzilate, Deanol Bisorcate, Deanol Cyclohexylpropionate, Deanol Hemisuccinate, Deanol Pidolate, Deanol Tartrate, Dimethylaminoethanol, Diméthylaminoéthanol, Dimethylaminoethanol Bitartrate, Dimethylethanolamine, DMAE, DMAE Bitartrate, Hémisuccinate de Déanol, Pidolate de Déanol.

What is Deanol?

Deanol is a chemical that is involved in a series of reactions that form acetylcholine, a chemical that is found in the brain and other areas of the body. Acetylcholine is a "neurotransmitter" that helps nerve cells communicate.

Deanol is used for treating attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Alzheimer's disease, autism, and a movement disorder called tardive dyskinesia. It is also used for improving memory and mood; boosting thinking skills and intelligence; and increasing physical energy, oxygen efficiency, athletic performance, and muscle reflexes. It is also used for preventing aging or liver spots, improving red blood cell function, and extending life span.

Deanol is applied to the skin for reducing signs of aging, particularly loose or sagging skin.

Deanol was previously sold by Riker Laboratories as the prescription drug Deaner. It was prescribed for the management of children with behavior problems and learning difficulties. Deanol is not an approved food additive in the U.S., nor is it an orphan drug, as some advertising suggests.

Possibly Effective for...

Likely Ineffective for...

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Treating aging skin. There is some early evidence that applying a 3% deanol gel to facial skin can tighten sagging skin.
  • Treating attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Improving memory and mood.
  • Improving intelligence and physical energy.
  • Preventing aging or liver spots.
  • Improving red blood cell function.
  • Improving muscle reflexes.
  • Increasing oxygen efficiency.
  • Extending life span.
  • Treating autism.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of deanol for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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