Font Size
A
A
A

Dementia Overview (cont.)

Authors and Editors

Author: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, Chief Medical Editor

REFERENCE:

"Types of Dementia." WebMD Medical Reference. 7 July 2012.

Previous contributing authors and editors: Coauthor: Julia Frank, MD. Editors: Nestor Galvez-Jimenez, MD, Program Director of Movement Disorders, Director of Neurology Residency Training Program, Department of Neurology, Division of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Florida; Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD, Senior Pharmacy Editor, eMedicine; Helmi L Lutsep, MD, Associate Director, Oregon Stroke Center; Associate Professor, Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/17/2013

Must Read Articles Related to Dementia Overview

Alzheimer's Disease
Alzheimer Disease Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in industrialized nations. Dementia is a brain disorder that interferes with a person's ability to...learn more >>
Alzheimer's Disease Facts
Alzheimer's Disease FAQs Alzheimer's disease is a fatal brain disorder. Familial and sporadic are the two types of Alzheimer's disease. The three stages include early, intermediate, and...learn more >>
Alzheimer's Disease Symptoms
Alzheimer's Disease Stages: Symptoms and Signs Alzheimer's disease is one of the many causes of dementia. Symptoms of Alzheimer's disease typically progress over a period of years. There are warning signs of...learn more >>

Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Dementia:

Dementia Overview - Symptoms

What are the symptoms of your dementia?

Dementia - Medications

What medications are you taking for dementia? Are they helping?

Dementia - Test

What kind of tests did you have to diagnose dementia?

Dementia - Treatment

What kind of treatment are you receiving for dementia?





Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Delirium, Dementia, and Amnesia »

Delirium, dementia, amnesia, and certain other alterations in cognition are subsumed under more general terms such as mental status change (MSC), acute confusional state (ACS), or organic brain syndrome (OBS).

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary