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Diaper Rash (cont.)

Diaper Rash Treatment

  • If the child (or adult) appears to have a candidal infection, the doctor may recommend antifungal creams or medicines.
  • If the child has impetigo (a bacterial infection), antibiotics may be prescribed.
  • Your doctor may recommend a short course of mild topical steroid cream or ointment if the rash does not appear to be a fungal infection.

Diaper Rash Prevention

Prevention is the most effective way to treat diaper rash.

  • Diapers today are highly absorbent and can wick away excess moisture from the skin. However, it is still a good idea to change the diapers every few hours to prevent urine or feces from coming into contact with skin.
  • Before putting on a new diaper, be sure that the skin is dry and clean.
  • When applying the diaper, avoid tape adhering to the skin, because this can also lead to breakdown and irritate the skin.
  • Good handwashing is a must to help prevent infections.
  • Try to air out the diaper area as much as possible.

Diaper Rash Prognosis

Diaper rash usually goes away on its own. In addition, a child will stop having episodes of diaper rash once potty-training has been successfully completed and the child no longer wears a diaper.

Medically reviewed by Margaret Walsh, MD; American Board of Pediatrics

REFERENCE:

Adam, R. "Skin Care of the Diaper Area." Pediatric Dermatology 25.4 July-Aug. 2008: 427-433.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/8/2014

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Diaper Dermatitis »

A prototypical example of irritant contact dermatitis, diaper dermatitis is caused by overhydration of the skin, maceration, prolonged contact with urine and feces, retained diaper soaps, and topical preparations.

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