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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Apokyn

Generic Name: apomorphine (Pronunciation: a poe MOR feen)

What is apomorphine (Apokyn)?

Apomorphine has some of the same effects as a chemical called dopamine, which occurs naturally in your body. Low levels of dopamine in the brain are associated with Parkinson's disease.

Apomorphine is used to treat "wearing-off" episodes (muscle stiffness, loss of muscle control) in people with advanced Parkinson's disease.

Apomorphine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of apomorphine (Apokyn)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • nausea or vomiting that continues after taking an anti-nausea medication;
  • feeling like you might pass out;
  • dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeat, feeling short of breath;
  • depression, confusion, hallucinations, unusual or inappropriate behavior;
  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • slow heart rate, weak pulse, fainting, slow breathing (breathing may stop);
  • severe headache;
  • worsening of your Parkinson symptoms;
  • twitching or uncontrollable movements of your eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs; or
  • penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • drowsiness, yawning;
  • runny nose;
  • swelling in your hands or feet;
  • pale skin, increased sweating;
  • flushing, (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling); or
  • bruising, redness, pain, itching, or hardening of your skin where the injection was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about apomorphine (Apokyn)?

You should not use apomorphine if you also taking alosetron (Lotronex), dolasetron (Anzemet), granisetron (Kytril), ondansetron (Zofran), or palonosetron (Aloxi).

Before using apomorphine, tell your doctor if you have an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood), a slow heart rate, low blood pressure or dizzy spells, a history of "Long QT syndrome," a history of stroke or heart attack, asthma, sulfite allergy, or liver or kidney disease.

Apomorphine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Some people using this medicine have fallen asleep during normal daytime activities such as talking, eating, or driving. You may fall asleep suddenly, even after feeling alert. If this happens to you, stop taking apomorphine and talk with your doctor.

You may have increased sexual urges, unusual urges to gamble, or other intense urges while taking this medication. Talk with your doctor if you believe you have any intense or unusual urges while taking apomorphine.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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