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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Acerola, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, C/Rose Hips, Cecon, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, C-Time, Ester-C, N Ice with Vitamin C, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips

Generic Name: ascorbic acid (vitamin C) (Pronunciation: as KORE bik AS id)

What is ascorbic acid (Acerola, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, C/Rose Hips, Cecon, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, C-Time, Ester-C, N Ice with Vitamin C, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips)?

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) occurs naturally in foods such as citrus fruit, tomatoes, potatoes, and leafy vegetables. Ascorbic acid is important for bones and connective tissues, muscles, and blood vessels. Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron, which is needed for red blood cell production.

Ascorbic acid is used to treat and prevent vitamin C deficiency.

Ascorbic acid may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of ascorbic acid?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using ascorbic acid and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • severe pain in your lower back or side;
  • blood in your urine;
  • pain when you urinate;
  • severe or ongoing diarrhea; or
  • feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious side effects may include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about ascorbic acid?

You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to ascorbic acid.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using ascorbic acid if you have kidney disease or a history of kidney stones, liver disease (especially cirrhosis), or an enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD).

It is not known whether ascorbic acid is harmful to an unborn baby or a nursing baby. Some vitamins and minerals are needed during pregnancy or for breast milk production, but some may be harmful if taken in large doses. Do not take ascorbic acid without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Ascorbic acid can be harmful to the kidneys, and this effect is increased when ascorbic acid is used together with other medicines that can harm the kidneys. Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor if you are receiving chemotherapy, or using medicines to treat a bowel disorder, medication to prevent organ transplant rejection, antiviral medications, pain or arthritis medicines, or any injected antibiotics. You may need dose adjustments or special tests when taking any of these medications together with ascorbic acid.

Before taking ascorbic acid, tell your doctor about all other medications you take.

Stop using ascorbic acid and call your doctor at once if you have severe pain in your lower back or side, blood in your urine, pain when you urinate, severe or ongoing diarrhea, or feel like you might pass out.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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