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bicalutamide (cont.)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking bicalutamide (Casodex)?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to bicalutamide.

Bicalutamide should never be taken by a woman or a child.

To make sure you can safely take bicalutamide, tell your doctor if you have liver disease, diabetes, or any other serious illness.

Although bicalutamide is not for use by women, this medication can cause birth defects if a woman is exposed to it during pregnancy.

How should I take bicalutamide (Casodex)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Bicalutamide is given as part of a combination prostate cancer treatment with another medication called a luteinizing (LOO-tee-in-ize-ing) hormone-releasing hormone, or LHRH. This medication prevents the testicles from producing testosterone.

Treatment with bicalutamide and LHRH is usually started at the same time. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Bicalutamide is usually taken once per day in the morning or evening. You may take the medicine with or without food. Try to take the medication at the same time each day.

LHRH is given as an injection or a tiny implant injected through a needle under the skin around your navel. LHRH injections are given at intervals such as once every 4 weeks. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not stop taking bicalutamide without your doctor's advice. If you stop your treatment suddenly, your condition may become worse.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition and is not causing harmful effects, your prostate and liver function will need to be checked with frequent blood tests. Visit your doctor regularly.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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