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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Menopause Support

Generic Name: black cohosh (Pronunciation: BLACK KOE hawsh)

What is black cohosh (Menopause Support)?

Black cohosh is also known as Cimicifuga racemosa, baneberry, bugbane, black snake root, rattleroot, bugwort, and richweed.

Black cohosh has been used in alternative medicine as an aid in treating the symptoms of menopause and menstrual discomfort. Black cohosh has also been used for rheumatism, cough, high cholesterol levels, and hardening of the arteries.

Not all uses for black cohosh have been approved by the FDA. Black cohosh should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Black cohosh is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Black cohosh may also be used for other purposes not listed in this product guide.

What are the possible side effects of black cohosh (Menopause Support)?

Although rare, allergic reactions to black cohosh may occur. Stop taking black cohosh and seek emergency medical attention if you experience symptoms of a serious allergic reaction including difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives.

Large doses of black cohosh have been reported to cause

  • nausea,
  • dizziness,
  • seizures,
  • visual disturbances,
  • reduced pulse rate, and
  • increased sweating.

Stomach upset has been reported as a common side effect with the use of therapeutic doses of black cohosh.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor, pharmacist, herbalist, or other healthcare provider about any unusual or bothersome side effect.

What is the most important information I should know about black cohosh (Menopause Support)?

Do not confuse black cohosh with blue cohosh, a very different herbal supplement with potentially damaging effects on the heart.

Do not take black cohosh without first talking to your doctor if you have ever been diagnosed with breast cancer. It is unknown whether black cohosh can stimulate breast cancer cell growth.

Not all uses for black cohosh have been approved by the FDA. Black cohosh should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Black cohosh is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Use black cohosh as directed on the label, or as your healthcare provider has prescribed. Do not use this product in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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