Font Size
A
A
A
1

Medications and Drugs

Brand Names:

Generic Name: dopamine (injection) (Pronunciation: DOE pa meen)

What is dopamine ()?

Dopamine is a medication form of a substance that occurs naturally in the body. It works by improving the pumping strength of the heart and improves blood flow to the kidneys.

Dopamine is used to treat certain conditions that occur when you are in shock, which may be caused by heart attack, trauma, surgery, heart failure, kidney failure, and other serious medical conditions.

Dopamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of dopamine injection ()?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Tell your caregivers at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • chest pain;
  • fast, slow, or pounding heartbeats;
  • painful or difficult urination, blood in your urine;
  • weakness, confusion, swelling in your feet or ankles, urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • weak or shallow breathing;
  • feeling like you might pass out, even while lying down;
  • burning, pain, or swelling around the IV needle;
  • cold feeling, numbness, or blue-colored appearance in your hands or feet; or
  • darkening or skin changes in your hands or feet.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • headache;
  • feeling anxious;
  • nausea, vomiting; or
  • chills, goosebumps.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about dopamine injection ()?

If possible before you receive dopamine injection, tell your caregivers if you have pheochromocytoma (tumor of the adrenal gland).

Also tell your caregivers if you have hardened arteries, circulation problems, diabetes, frostbite, Buergers disease, asthma, sulfite allergy, or a history of blood clots.

Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use, especially if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 21 days.

In an emergency situation it may not be possible before you are treated to tell your caregivers about your health conditions or if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Make sure any doctor caring for you afterward knows that you have received this medication.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Pill Identifier Tool

Need help identifying pills and medications?
Use the pill finder tool on RxList.






Medical Dictionary