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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Retisert

Generic Name: fluocinolone ophthalmic implant (Pronunciation: floo oh SIN oh lone off THAL mik IM plant)

What is fluocinolone ophthalmic implant (Retisert)?

Fluocinolone is in a group of drugs called corticosteroids. It prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Fluocinolone ophthalmic (for the eye) implant is used to treat inflammation within the eye that may be caused by a variety of diseases or infections. The implant slowly releases fluocinolone into the eye over a period of approximately 30 months. Fluocinolone will not treat an eye infection.

Fluocinolone ophthalmic implant may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of fluocinolone ophthalmic implant (Retisert)?

For the first 1 to 4 weeks after receiving the implant, you may have a temporary decrease in vision. Call your doctor if your vision does not return to normal after 4 weeks. Fluocinolone ophthalmic implant will not correct vision problems (such as near-sightedness or far-sightedness) that you had before receiving the implant.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • sudden vision loss, eye pain or redness;
  • bleeding, oozing, or crusting of your eyes;
  • cloudiness in the pupils or iris of your eyes;
  • seeing flashes of light, halos around lights, or "floaters" in your vision; or
  • tunnel vision, problems with peripheral (side) vision.

Less serious side effects may include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about fluocinolone ophthalmic implant (Retisert)?

The fluocinolone ophthalmic implant is surgically placed into the eye. If both eyes will be treated, the implants will most likely be placed at two separate times, to decrease your risk of infection in both eyes at the same time.

Before receiving the implant, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have glaucoma, herpes simplex or other eye infection, or if you have recently had cataract surgery.

Do not use any eye medications that your doctor has not prescribed.

Fluocinolone ophthalmic implant can cause dizziness or blurred vision. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly.

For the first 1 to 4 weeks after receiving the implant, you may have a temporary decrease in vision. Call your doctor if your vision does not return to normal after 4 weeks. Fluocinolone ophthalmic implant will not correct vision problems (such as near-sightedness or far-sightedness) that you had before receiving the implant.

The placement of the fluocinolone ophthalmic implant may increase your risk of developing cataracts and eventually needing cataract surgery. Talk with your doctor if you have concerns about this risk.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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