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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names:

Generic Name: H1N1 influenza virus vaccine (nasal) (Pronunciation: IN floo EN za VYE rus VAX een)

What is H1N1 influenza virus vaccine ()?

H1N1 influenza is sometimes called "swine flu" because it is usually found in pigs. You cannot become infected with H1N1 influenza from eating pork products.

H1N1 influenza virus can spread from one person to another through small droplets of saliva that are expelled into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The virus can also be passed through contact with objects the infected person has touched, such as a door handle or other surfaces.

H1N1 influenza virus vaccine is used to prevent infection caused by the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus.

The nasal H1N1 influenza virus vaccine is a "live virus" vaccine. H1N1 influenza virus vaccine is also available in an injectable form, which is a "killed virus" vaccine.

H1N1 influenza virus vaccine works by exposing you to a small dose of the virus, which helps your body to develop immunity to the disease. This vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

H1N1 influenza virus nasal vaccine is for use in people between the ages of 2 years and 49 years.

Becoming infected with influenza is much more dangerous to your health than receiving the vaccine to protect against it. Most people with H1N1 influenza have recovered, but the virus has caused some deaths. Like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects, but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Like any vaccine, H1N1 influenza virus vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person. This vaccine will not prevent illness caused by avian flu ("bird flu").

What are the possible side effects of H1N1 influenza virus nasal vaccine ()?

The nasal form of H1N1 influenza virus vaccine is a "live virus" vaccine and may cause you to have mild flu-like symptoms. However, you may have flu-like symptoms at any time during flu season that may be caused by strains of influenza virus that are not contained in the vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first dose.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever have to receive another H1N1 influenza virus vaccine in the future, you will need to tell the doctor if the first vaccine caused any side effects.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • wheezing, trouble breathing;
  • weakness, numbness or tingly feeling in your feet and spreading upward; or
  • high fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms.

Less serious side effects can last a day or two after you receive this vaccine and may include:

  • runny or stuffy nose, sneezing;
  • low fever;
  • stomach pain, loss of appetite;
  • feeling tired or irritable;
  • headache; or
  • muscle pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report vaccine side effects to the US Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-822-7967.

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine ()?

The nasal H1N1 influenza virus vaccine is a "live virus" vaccine. H1N1 influenza virus vaccine is also available in an injectable form, which is a "killed virus" vaccine. This medication guide addresses only the nasal form of this vaccine.

H1N1 influenza is sometimes called "swine flu" because it is usually found in pigs. You cannot become infected with H1N1 influenza from eating pork products.

Do not receive this vaccine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a flu vaccine, if you are under 18 years old and have recently taken aspirin, or if you are allergic to eggs, arginine, or gelatin.

Before you receive H1N1 influenza virus nasal vaccine, tell your doctor if you have asthma, a weak immune system, or a history of Guillain-Barré syndrome or neurologic disorder affecting the brain (especially if these were caused by a vaccine).

Also tell your doctor if you have used a flu medication such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) or zanamivir (Relenza) within the past 48 hours.

You can still receive an H1N1 influenza vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. If you ever have to receive another influenza virus vaccine in the future, you will need to tell the doctor if the first vaccine caused any side effects.

Like any vaccine, H1N1 influenza virus vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person. This vaccine will not prevent illness caused by avian flu ("bird flu").

Becoming infected with influenza is much more dangerous to your health than receiving the vaccine to protect against it. Most people with H1N1 influenza have recovered, but the virus has caused some deaths.



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