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indomethacin (cont.)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking indomethacin (Indocin, Indocin SR)?

Taking an NSAID can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. This risk will increase the longer you use an NSAID. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

NSAIDs can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and gastrointestinal effects can occur without warning at any time while you are taking an NSAID. Older adults may have an even greater risk of these serious gastrointestinal side effects.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to indomethacin, or if you have a history of allergic reaction to aspirin or other NSAIDs.

Before taking indomethacin tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take indomethacin.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Taking indomethacin during the last 3 months of pregnancy may harm the unborn baby. Do not take indomethacin during pregnancy unless your doctor has told you to.

Indomethacin passes into breast milk and may affect a nursing baby. Do not take indomethacin without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give this medicine to a child younger than 14 years old without the advice of a doctor.

How should I take indomethacin (Indocin, Indocin SR)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take indomethacin with food or milk to lessen stomach upset.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release capsule. Swallow the pill whole. It is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking or opening the pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

If you take indomethacin for a long period of time, your doctor may want to check you on a regular basis to make sure this medication is not causing harmful effects. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using indomethacin.

Store indomethacin at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not allow the liquid medicine to freeze.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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