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influenza virus vaccine (nasal) (cont.)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving this vaccine (FluMist 2012-2013)?

You may not be able to receive this vaccine if you are allergic to eggs, or if you have:

  • a history of severe allergic reaction to a flu vaccine;
  • a history of Guillian-Barre syndrome (within 6 weeks after receiving a flu vaccine);
  • a weak immune system caused by disease, bone marrow transplant, or by using certain medicines or receiving cancer treatments;
  • if someone in your household has a weak immune system; or
  • if you are under 18 years old and have recently taken aspirin or other similar medicines such as Nuprin Backache Caplet, Kaopectate, KneeRelief, Pamprin Cramp Formula, Pepto-Bismol, Tricosal, Trilisate, and others.

To make sure influenza virus nasal vaccine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • asthma or other lung disorder;
  • a history of seizures;
  • a neurologic disorder or disease affecting the brain (or if this was a reaction to a previous vaccine); or
  • if you have used a flu medication such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) or zanamivir (Relenza) within the past 48 hours.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

Vaccines may be harmful to an unborn baby and generally should not be given to a pregnant woman. However, not vaccinating the mother could be more harmful to the baby if the mother becomes infected with a disease that this vaccine could prevent. Your doctor will decide whether you should receive this vaccine, especially if you have a high risk of infection with influenza.

It is not known whether influenza virus nasal vaccine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

This vaccine should not be given to anyone younger than 2 or older than 49 years of age.

How is this vaccine given (FluMist 2012-2013)?

This vaccine is given as a nasal spray into each nostril. A healthcare provider will give you this vaccine.

You should receive a flu vaccine every year. Your immunity will gradually decrease over the 12 months after you receive the influenza virus vaccine. Children receiving this vaccine may need a repeat dose two months after receiving the first vaccine.

The influenza virus vaccine is usually given in October or November. Some people may need to have their vaccines earlier or later. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may recommend treating fever and pain with an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, and others) when the vaccine is given and for the next 24 hours. Follow the label directions or your doctor's instructions about how much of this medicine to take.

It is especially important to prevent fever from occurring if you have a seizure disorder such as epilepsy.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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