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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Magnesium Sulfate-Sodium Chloride, Sulfamag

Generic Name: magnesium sulfate (injection) (Pronunciation: mag NEE see um SUL fate)

What is magnesium sulfate injection (Magnesium Sulfate-Sodium Chloride, Sulfamag)?

Magnesium is a naturally occurring mineral that is important for many systems in the body especially the muscles and nerves.

Magnesium sulfate injection is used to treat hypomagnesemia (low levels of magnesium in your blood).

Magnesium sulfate injection is also used to prevent seizures in pregnant women with conditions such as pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, or toxemia of pregnancy.

Magnesium sulfate injection may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of magnesium sulfate injection (Magnesium Sulfate-Sodium Chloride, Sulfamag)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Tell your caregiver right away if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • feeling like you might pass out;
  • sweating, anxiety, cold feeling;
  • flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling);
  • weak or shallow breathing;
  • extreme drowsiness, feeling very weak; or
  • numbness or tingly feeling around your mouth, muscle tightness or contraction, overactive reflexes.

Less serious side effects are more likely, and you may have none at all.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about magnesium sulfate injection (Magnesium Sulfate-Sodium Chloride, Sulfamag)?

Magnesium sulfate is injected into a muscle or into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting.

If possible before you receive magnesium sulfate, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, heart disease, a stomach or intestinal disorder, or if you are dehydrated.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially an IV (injected) antibiotic.

Tell your doctor if you drink alcohol or caffeine drinks regularly, if you smoke, or if you use any street drugs. These factors can affect the way magnesium sulfate injection works in your body.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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