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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: MCT

Generic Name: medium chain triglycerides (Pronunciation: MEE dee um CHAIN trye GLIS er ides)

What is medium chain triglycerides (MCT)?

Medium chain triglycerides is a medical food derived from fatty acids and safflower oil, a polyunsaturated fat source.

Medium chain triglycerides is for dietary use in people whose bodies cannot digest certain foods properly. This includes people who are gluten or lactose intolerant, or who have unintended weight loss or need increased calories for other medical reasons.

Medium chain triglycerides does not contain protein or carbohydrates.

Medium chain triglycerides may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of medium chain triglycerides (MCT)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about medium chain triglycerides (MCT)?

You should not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to medium chain triglycerides.

Before you take medium chain triglycerides, tell your doctor if you have any type of severe liver problems such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, high blood pressure inside the liver, brain or nervous system complications caused by severe liver damage, or if you have had a "portacaval shunt" placed in your body.

Use this medication as directed on the label, or as your doctor has prescribed. Do not use the medication in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Get emergency medical help if you think you have used too much medicine, or if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects are more likely, and you may have none at all. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effects.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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