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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Orthoclone OKT3

Generic Name: muromonab-CD3 (Pronunciation: myoo roe MOE nab)

What is muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone OKT3)?

Muromonab-CD3 lowers your body's immune system. The immune system helps your body fight infections. The immune system can also fight or "reject" a transplanted organ such as a kidney. This is because the immune system treats the new organ as an invader.

Muromonab-CD3 is used with other medications to prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant.

Muromonab-CD3 may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone OKT3)?

Some people receiving a muromonab-CD3 injection have had a reaction to the infusion (within 30 to 60 minutes after the medicine is injected into the vein). Tell your caregiver right away if you feel chilled or feverish, nauseated, weak, shaky, or light-headed, or if you have a headache, or joint and muscle aches. These side effects may also occur up to several hours after your injection.

Tell your caregivers right away if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • wheezing, gasping, shortness of breath;
  • fast or uneven heart rate, chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • confusion, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior;
  • fever, headache, neck stiffness, chills, increased sensitivity to light;
  • loss of vision or muscle control;
  • seizure (black-out or convulsions);
  • pain or burning when you urinate;
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; or
  • high fever, chills, stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, tremors, body aches, flu symptoms.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • mild headache;
  • nausea, constipation, upset stomach;
  • sleep problems (insomnia); or
  • swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone OKT3)?

Muromonab-CD3 is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. You will receive this injection just before your transplant and again 4 days afterward. The medicine must be given slowly through an IV infusion, and can take up to 30 minutes to complete.

Some people receiving a muromonab-CD3 injection have had a reaction to the infusion (within 30 to 60 minutes after the medicine is injected into the vein). Tell your caregiver right away if you feel chilled or feverish, nauseated, weak, shaky, or light-headed, or if you have a headache, or joint and muscle aches. These side effects may also occur up to several hours after your injection.

Muromonab-CD3 can lower the blood cells that help your body fight infections. This can make it easier for you to bleed from an injury or get sick from being around others who are ill. To be sure your blood cells do not get too low, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. It is important that you not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor after your transplant.

Avoid contact with people who have colds, the flu, or other contagious illnesses. Contact your doctor immediately if you develop signs of infection.

Avoid receiving a vaccine or flu shot shortly after you have been treated with muromonab-CD3, unless your doctor has told you to.

There may be other drugs that can affect muromonab-CD3. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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