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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Arranon

Generic Name: nelarabine (Pronunciation: nel AR a been)

What is nelarabine (Arranon)?

Nelarabine is a cancer medication that interferes with the growth and spread of cancer cells in the body.

Nelarabine is used to treat T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma.

Nelarabine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of nelarabine (Arranon)?

Nelarabine may cause serious side effects of the central nervous system. These symptoms may not go away even after you stop receiving nelarabine. Talk with your doctor if you have concerns about any possible long-term side effects.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • confusion or clumsiness, extreme drowsiness, fainting;
  • loss of balance or coordination;
  • problems with walking, breathing, speech, swallowing, or eye movement;
  • numbness, weakness, or prickly feeling in your fingers or toes;
  • problems with buttoning clothes or picking up small items with your fingers;
  • loss of movement in any part of your body;
  • seizure (convulsions);
  • pale skin, feeling light-headed or short of breath, rapid heart rate, trouble concentrating;
  • easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;
  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, sores in your mouth and throat; or
  • severe shortness of breath, wheezing, gasping for breath, cough with foamy mucus, chest pain, fast or uneven heart rate.

Less serious side effects may include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about nelarabine (Arranon)?

Nelarabine may cause serious side effects of the central nervous system, such as problems with balance, coordination, or fine motor skills. These symptoms may not go away even after you stop receiving nelarabine. Talk with your doctor if you have concerns about any possible long-term side effects.

Do not use nelarabine if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby.

You should not breast-feed while you are using nelarabine.

Before you receive nelarabine, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease, a nerve disorder, a history of chemotherapy or radiation treatment of your head, neck, or spinal cord.

Nelarabine can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections and help your blood to clot. Your blood may need to be tested often. Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Avoid activities that may increase your risk of bleeding injury. Tell your doctor at once if you develop signs of infection.

Do not receive a "live" vaccine while you are being treated with nelarabine.

This medication may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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