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oxytocin (cont.)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving oxytocin (Pitocin)?

You should not receive this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to oxytocin.

To make sure oxytocin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • genital herpes;
  • diabetes;
  • high blood pressure;
  • a heart rhythm disorder;
  • a history of cervical cancer;
  • a history of severe infection in your uterus;
  • a history of difficult labor because you have a small pelvis;
  • if you have ever had surgery on your cervix or uterus (including a prior C-section);
  • if your pregnancy is less than 37 weeks; or
  • if you have had 5 or more pregnancies.

How is oxytocin given (Pitocin)?

Oxytocin is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a hospital setting.

Your contractions and other vital signs will be watched closely while you are receiving oxytocin. This will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with this medication.

During labor, your baby's heart rate will also be watched with a fetal heart monitor to evaluate any effects of oxytocin on the baby.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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