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potassium iodide (cont.)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking potassium iodide (iOSAT, ThyroSafe, ThyroShield)?

You should not use this medication if you have a history of previous allergic reaction to iodide, iodine, or other medicines.

To make sure potassium iodide is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use potassium iodide if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. Use effective birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

Potassium iodide can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

How should I take potassium iodide (iOSAT, ThyroSafe, ThyroShield)?

Potassium iodide is usually taken 3 to 4 times per day. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Measure liquid medicine with the special dose-measuring dropper provided with your medication. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Mix this medicine with a full glass of milk, water, or fruit juice.

Take with food or milk to avoid an upset stomach.

Use this medicine for only as long as needed to get the best results. Your doctor can determine how long to treat you with potassium iodide.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using potassium iodide.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use. Avoid storing the medicine in very cold temperatures. If the medicine changes color to brown or yellow, throw it away and call your pharmacist for new medicine.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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