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quazepam (cont.)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking quazepam (Doral)?

Some people using this medicine have engaged in activity such as driving, eating, or making phone calls and later having no memory of the activity. If this happens to you, stop taking quazepam and talk with your doctor about another treatment for your sleep disorder.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to quazepam or to other benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clorazepate (Tranxene), diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), midazolam (Versed), temazepam (Restoril), or triazolam (Halcion).

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take quazepam.

  • asthma, emphysema, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), or other breathing problems;
  • kidney or liver disease;
  • a history of depression, mental illness, suicidal thoughts or behavior; or
  • a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

FDA pregnancy category X. Quazepam can cause birth defects in an unborn baby. It may also cause withdrawal symptoms in a newborn if the mother takes quazepam during pregnancy. Do not use quazepam if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Use an effective form of birth control while you are using this medication.

Quazepam can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

The sedative effects of quazepam may last longer in older adults. Accidental falls are common in elderly patients who take benzodiazepines. Use caution to avoid falling or accidental injury while you are taking quazepam.

Do not give this medication to anyone under 18 years old.

How should I take quazepam (Doral)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Do not take quazepam with food or just after a meal.

Contact your doctor if this medicine seems to stop working as well in helping you fall asleep and stay asleep.

Quazepam should be used for only a short time to treat insomnia. After 7 to 10 nights of use, talk with your doctor about whether or not you should keep taking quazepam. Do not take this medication for longer than 12 weeks without your doctor's advice.

Your insomnia symptoms may return when you stop using quazepam, especially during the first day or two. You may also have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms such as vomiting, stomach pain, muscle cramps, sweating, shaky or unpleasant feeling, or seizure (convulsions). Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using quazepam.

Quazepam may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Quazepam should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

Store quazepam at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Keep track of how many tablets have been used from each new bottle of this medicine. Benzodiazepines are drugs of abuse and you should be aware if any person in the household is using this medicine improperly or without a prescription.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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