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ranibizumab (ophthalmic) (cont.)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving ranibizumab (Lucentis)?

You should not receive ranibizumab if you are allergic to it, or if you have any type of infection in or around your eyes.

To make sure you can safely receive ranibizumab ophthalmic, tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, or a history of blood clots or stroke.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ranibizumab will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

It is not known whether ranibizumab passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How is ranibizumab given (Lucentis)?

Ranibizumab is given as an injection into your eye. Your doctor will use a medicine to numb your eye before giving you the injection. You will receive this injection in your doctor's office or other clinic setting.

For a short time after your injection, your eyes will be checked periodically to make sure the injection has not caused any side effects.

Ranibizumab is usually given once every month. After you have received the first 4 injections, your doctor may change your injection schedule to once every 3 months.

Follow your doctor's dosing instructions very carefully. The timing of your monthly injections is very important for this medication to be effective.

To be sure this medicine is helping your condition and is not causing harmful effects, your eyes will need to be checked on a regular basis. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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