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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Saljet Rinse, Saljet Sterile

Generic Name: sodium chloride (flush) (Pronunciation: SOE dee um KLOR ide)

What is sodium chloride flush (Saljet Rinse, Saljet Sterile)?

Sodium chloride is the chemical name for salt. Sodium chloride can reduce some types of bacteria.

Sodium chloride flush is used to clean out an intravenous (IV) catheter, which helps prevent blockage and removes any medicine left in the catheter area after you have received an IV infusion.

Sodium chloride may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of sodium chloride flush (Saljet Rinse, Saljet Sterile)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using sodium chloride flush and call your doctor at once if you have any of these side effects while using the flush:

  • severe irritation;
  • swelling;
  • warmth;
  • redness;
  • oozing; or
  • pain.

Less serious side effects may include mild irritation around the catheter.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about sodium chloride flush (Saljet Rinse, Saljet Sterile)?

Call your doctor or tell your caregivers if your catheter, needle, or IV tubing becomes blocked or if the flush or IV medicine is not flowing normally.

Stop using sodium chloride flush and call your doctor at once if you have severe irritation, swelling, warmth, redness, oozing, or pain around your catheter while using the flush.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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