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sorbitol (cont.)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking sorbitol ()?

You should not use sorbitol if you are allergic to it.

A laxative may be habit forming and should be used only until your bowel habits return to normal. Never share sorbitol with another person, especially someone with a history of eating disorder. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have:

  • any allergy;
  • nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain that has not been checked by a doctor;
  • if your bowel habits have changed suddenly in the past 2 weeks.

It is not known whether sorbitol will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medication without medical advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether sorbitol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine.

Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice.

How should I take sorbitol ()?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Sorbitol is usually taken only for a short time until your symptoms clear up.

Do not use this medication for longer than 1 week without the advice of your doctor.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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