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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Brethaire

Generic Name: terbutaline inhalation (Pronunciation: ter BYOO ta leen)

What is terbutaline inhalation (Brethaire)?

Terbutaline is a bronchodilator. It works by relaxing muscles in the airways to improve breathing.

Terbutaline inhalation is used to treat conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema.

Terbutaline inhalation may also be used for conditions other than those listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of terbutaline inhalation (Brethaire)?

Stop using terbutaline inhalation and seek emergency medical attention if you experience any of the following serious side effects:

  • an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); or
  • chest pain or irregular heartbeats.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to use terbutaline inhalation and talk to your doctor if you experience

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about terbutaline inhalation (Brethaire)?

It is very important that you use the terbutaline inhaler properly, so that the medicine gets into your lungs. You doctor may want you to use a spacer with the inhaler. Talk to your doctor about proper inhaler use.

Seek medical attention if you notice that you require more than your usual or more than the maximum amount of any asthma medication in a 24-hour period. An increased need for medication could be an early sign of a serious asthma attack.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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