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Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Vitamin B1

Generic Name: thiamine (vitamin B1) (Pronunciation: THIGH a min)

What is thiamine (Vitamin B1)?

Thiamine is vitamin B1. Thiamine is found in foods such as cereals, whole grains, meat, nuts, beans, and peas. Thiamine is important in the breakdown of carbohydrates from foods into products needed by the body.

Thiamine is used to treat or prevent vitamin B1 deficiency. Thiamine injection is used to treat beriberi, a serious condition caused by prolonged lack of vitamin B1.

Thiamine taken by mouth (oral) is available without a prescription. Injectable thiamine must be given by a healthcare professional.

Thiamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of thiamine (Vitamin B1)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • blue colored lips;
  • chest pain, feeling short of breath;
  • black, bloody, or tarry stools; or
  • coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • nausea, tight feeling in your throat;
  • sweating, feeling warm;
  • mild rash or itching;
  • feeling restless; or
  • tenderness or a hard lump where a thiamine injection was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about thiamine (Vitamin B1)?

You should not use thiamine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to it.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before taking thiamine if you have any medical conditions, if you take other medications or herbal products, or if you are allergic to any drugs or foods.

Before you receive injectable thiamine, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease.

Thiamine is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat or avoid to help control your condition.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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