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topical emollients (cont.)

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using topical emollients?

You should not use a topical emollient if you are allergic to it. Topical emollients will not treat or prevent a skin infection.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use this medicine if you have:

  • deep wounds or open sores;
  • swelling, warmth, redness, oozing, or bleeding;
  • large areas of skin irritation;
  • any type of allergy; or
  • if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

How should I use topical emollients?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Clean the skin where you will apply the topical emollient. It may help to apply this product when your skin is wet or damp. Follow directions on the product label.

Shake the product container if recommended on the label.

Apply a small amount of topical emollient to the affected area and rub in gently.

If you are using a stick, pad, or soap form of topical emollient, follow directions for use on the product label.

Do not use this product over large area of skin. Do not apply a topical emollient to a deep puncture wound or severe burn without medical advice.

If your skin appears white or gray and feels soggy, you may be applying too much topical emollient or using it too often.

Some forms of topical emollient may be flammable and should not be used near high heat or open flame, or applied while you are smoking.

Store as directed away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle, tube, or other container tightly closed when not in use.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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