Font Size
A
A
A
1

Medications and Drugs

Brand Names: Triesence, Trivaris Intravitreal

Generic Name: triamcinolone (ophthalmic) (Pronunciation: trye am SIN oh lone off THAL mik)

What is triamcinolone ophthalmic (Triesence, Trivaris Intravitreal)?

Triamcinolone is a steroid. It prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Triamcinolone ophthalmic (for the eyes) is injected into the eye to treat inflammation caused by disease or injury. Triamcinolone ophthalmic is usually given after steroid eye drops have been used without successful treatment of symptoms.

Triamcinolone ophthalmic is also used during a certain type of eye surgery.

Triamcinolone ophthalmic may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of triamcinolone ophthalmic (Triesence, Trivaris Intravitreal)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • problems with your vision, pain behind your eyes, or seeing halos around lights;
  • eye swelling, redness, severe discomfort, crusting or drainage (may be signs of infection);
  • large red or purple spots on your skin;
  • fast or slow heart rate;
  • feeling short of breath, swelling in your hands or feet;
  • dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, uneven heartbeats, seizure);
  • severe dizziness or nausea;
  • severe depression, changes in mood or behavior, seizures (convulsions); or
  • severe pain in your upper stomach.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • mild eye discomfort;
  • headaches, back aches, weakness;
  • bloating, appetite changes, weight gain;
  • changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, face, neck, breasts, and waist), roundness in your face;
  • increased acne or facial hair;
  • menstrual problems (in women), impotence or loss of interest in sex (in men);
  • dry skin, thinning skin, changes in skin color;
  • bruising, sweating more than usual; or
  • any wound that will not heal.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about triamcinolone ophthalmic (Triesence, Trivaris Intravitreal)?

You should not receive this medication if you are allergic to triamcinolone, or if you have a fungal infection anywhere in your body.

Do not use triamcinolone if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby.

Before receiving triamcinolone ophthalmic, tell your doctor if you have any type of bacterial, fungal, or viral infection (including tuberculosis). Also tell your doctor if you have cataracts or glaucoma, herpes infection of your eye, diabetes, high blood pressure, congestive heart failure, a thyroid disorder, myasthenia gravis, a stomach or intestinal disorder, or a history of recent heart attack.

Before you receive any vaccine, talk with the doctor who is treating you with triamcinolone ophthalmic. Some vaccines may not work as well or could cause harmful side effects during treatment with steroid medicine.

Steroids can lower the blood cells that help your body fight infections. Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles.

There are many other drugs that can interact with triamcinolone. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you.



Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Pill Identifier Tool

Need help identifying pills and medications?
Use the pill finder tool on RxList.



NIH talks about Ebola on WebMD